In the last article, we talked about how to talk to the visitors who come to your landing page via the ad copy you put on here, as well as how to make everything flow. We have a few more great tactics to talk about here in Part #2. Let’s get started..

Tactic #4: Have One Singular Purpose…

Focus is power. If you’re landing page attempts to accomplish 15 different things, then it’s going to go no where. Your landing page should have one goal, and one goal only. Typically, this is to make a sale, or get someone’s credit card information for a free trial, but it could be just to get opt-ins, to get leads, etc. Whatever it is… stick to it. Don’t talk about how people should sign up and buy your product, and then tell them to fill in their details, or sign up for your list, etc. Everything on one page should have (and only one) singular goal. Of course, if you have an exit pop or something, you can use this redirect to offer something else, such as starting with your product, and then moving to trying to get a quick opt-in, or try selling your product, and then going for a free trial, but keep it on separate pages.

 

Tactic #5: Keep In Mind Where Their Eyes Are…

When designing your landing page, whether it’s graphic design, or determining where certain parts of the text should go, always make sure you’re keeping in mind where the person’s eyes are. For example, some images might be too distracting for them, or they could lead their eyes mistakenly back up the page. The images you put down, and the entire design of the page should be leading them smoothly downwards, just as the copy should lead them smoothly down the page (Tactic #1) so should the entire layout. For example, if you have images of people, they should be looking AT the text, not away from it (as people are drawn to looking at where others are looking) and on top of that, having them look DOWN the page, not up, is a good thing as well (to prevent people from backtracking up the text). This is just one example, but you can think of countless other ways to implement this technique into your own copy.

landing page design

Tactic #6: Links Shouldn’t Be Going To More Than One Place…

If you have a regular website, then you probably have a navigation bar at the top of the page, with About Us, Contact Us, Sitemap, etc. You SHOULDN’T use this same layout for your landing pages. Reason being you don’t want people getting distracted and going off to other pages that have no hope of closing the sale, or getting the visitor to take whatever action you want them to take. If you spend money to acquire a visitor, and then that visitor goes off and reads the “About Us” page, chances are they’re going to get distracted, and not turn into any money, which means money down the drain. This is true though for any links you might have on your page.

This is especially true for links to interesting articles, or YouTube videos (especially YouTube videos, if they go to YouTube, they’re long gone). Now, this doesn’t mean of course that you can only have one link on your entire landing page… you should still have several call to action links throughout, but they should ALL be going to just one page, which in most cases, is the payment page (or the lead capture page, if it’s a lead). You can also have call to action links throughout that lead to the bottom of the page where you have a lead form, for example. In any case, just make sure not to lead them off in directions you don’t want them going.

landing page design

Tactic #7: Stop Trying To Be Clever…

When writing the copy on your landing page, you shouldn’t just try to be clever, or express to the audience how “creative” you are. Novice copywriters always (for some reason) make the mistake of thinking that “good” copy should be clever, witty, and artistic, as well as use big, fancy words. You know who’s good at writing like this? Poets… and how much money do they make? You’re in this business to make money, not to be poetic. You should try to explain what you have to offer in an enticing way, but without trying to be too “crafty”. Not only is this just poor copy, but it can also causes people to shy away from wanting to do business with you because they’ll (mistakenly) look at you like a clever salesman who’s very good at getting people to part with their money, and this will create buying resistance within your visitors immediately. It’s a much better approach to just be friendly.